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The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) is a joint program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAFGI), and the State of Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (ADGGS).
RESTLESS VOLCANOES
Great Sitkin
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Cleveland
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Semisopochnoi
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NEWS
90th Anniversary of the 1931 eruption of Aniakchak Volcano, Alaska
Posted: May 03, 2021
Aniakchak Volcano (also known as Aniakchak crater or caldera) on the Alaska Peninsula is one of the most spectacular volcanic centers in Alaska (and we dare say, the world!)


Aerial view, looking east, of Aniakchak caldera, M. Williams, 1977


For approximately 6 weeks in May and June of 1931, Aniakchak erupted intermittently in violent fashion, producing widely-felt earthquakes and concussive explosions, blanketing the surrounding region in ash, and reaming new craters within the caldera. Eruption of lava within these craters may have continued into early July.
To mark this anniversary, AVO geologists familiar with Aniakchak will present some interesting tidbits to tell the story of the eruption, its impacts, and other information about this fascinating volcano. What we know about the 1931 eruption comes from contemporary newspaper accounts, the writings and dramatic photographs of Father Bernard Hubbard (aka the “Glacier Priest”) of Santa Clara University, and geologic fieldwork by AVO volcanologists. Check out the many resources on our web page if you want to learn more: https://www.avo.alaska.edu/volcanoes/volcinfo.php?volcname=Aniakchak

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ALASKA VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Sunday, May 16, 2021, 10:08 AM AKDT (Sunday, May 16, 2021, 18:08 UTC)


GREAT SITKIN VOLCANO (VNUM #311120)
52°4'35" N 176°6'39" W, Summit Elevation 5709 ft (1740 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

A few small earthquakes were observed in seismic data over the past 24 hours. No activity has been observed in partly cloudy web camera and satellite images during the past day.

Great Sitkin volcano is monitored by local seismic and infrasound sensors, satellite data, web cameras, and remote infrasound and lightning networks.


SEMISOPOCHNOI VOLCANO (VNUM #311060)
51°55'44" N 179°35'52" E, Summit Elevation 2625 ft (800 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

No activity from the volcano has been observed in cloudy satellite data or regional infrasound arrays over the past 24 hours.

When occurring, small eruptions producing minor ash deposits within the vicinity of the active north crater of Mount Cerberus and ash clouds under 10,000 ft above sea level are typical of activity at Semisopochnoi.

Semisopochnoi is monitored by satellite data, regional infrasound, and lightning detection instruments. An infrasound array on Adak Island may detect explosive emissions from Semisopochnoi with a slight delay (approximately 13 minutes) if atmospheric conditions permit.


CLEVELAND VOLCANO (VNUM #311240)
52°49'20" N 169°56'42" W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

No activity at Cleveland Volcano was observed in relatively clear satellite images from last night and no activity is observed in seismic and infrasound data from the past day.

Episodes of lava effusion and explosions can occur without advance warning. Explosions from Cleveland are normally short duration and only present a hazard to aviation in the immediate vicinity of the volcano. Larger explosions that present a more widespread hazard to aviation are possible, but are less likely and occur less frequently.

When operational, Cleveland volcano is monitored by only two seismic stations, which restricts AVO's ability to precisely locate earthquakes and detect precursory unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption may be possible using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.


OTHER ALASKA VOLCANOES

Information on all Alaska volcanoes is available at : http://www.avo.alaska.edu.

For definitions of Aviation Color Codes and Volcano Alert Levels, see: http://www.avo.alaska.edu/color_codes.php

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CONTACT INFORMATION:

Michelle Coombs, Scientist-in-Charge, USGS
mcoombs@usgs.gov (907) 786-7497

David Fee, Coordinating Scientist, UAF
dfee1@alaska.edu (907) 322-4085

The Alaska Volcano Observatory is a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys.
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URL: www.avo.alaska.edu/index.php
Page modified: March 26, 2021 13:42
Contact Information: AVO Web Team

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