WorldView-3 satellite imagery from December 19, 2021 shows the current eruption in the summit region of Pavlof Volcano. The east vent is active, sending a lava flow down the eastern flank. A tephra deposit from explosive activity on December 14, 2021 is also visible on the northeastern flank of the volcano. Older deposits from 2021 and the 2016 vent are labeled.

WorldView-3 satellite imagery from December 19, 2021 shows the current eruption in the summit region of Pavlof Volcano. The east vent is active, sending a lava flow down the eastern flank. A tephra deposit from explosive activity on December 14, 2021 is also visible on the northeastern flank of the volcano. Older deposits from 2021 and the 2016 vent are labeled.

Date: Dec 19th, 2021
Volcano(es): Pavlof
Photographer: Dietterich, Hannah
URL: avo.alaska.edu/image/view/180271

Pavlof 2021/08

AVO raised the status of Pavlof Volcano from GREEN/NORMAL to YELLOW/ADVISORY on July 9, 2021, citing increased seismic activity over the past day, characterized by near-continuous tremor. The tremor was also been observed in infrasound and regional seismic data. No eruptive activity or emissions from the summit were observed in cloudy satellite and web camera views. The increase in seismicity does not mean that an eruption is imminent however past eruptions of Pavlof occurred with little or no warning.
Low-level ash emissions were observed in webcamera views beginning on August 5, 2021, prompting AVO to raise the Aviation Color Code and Volcano Alert Level at Pavlof to ORANGE/WATCH. Intermittent bursts of ash produced diffuse ash clouds rising just above Pavlof’s summit, dissipating within 6 miles. Intermittent, short-lived small explosions detected in seismic and infrasound data and low-level ash plumes seen in webcamera views continued through August, September, and October 2021. Ash deposits have been confined to the flanks of the volcano. On November 8, 2021, a small lava flow was observed in satellite images. On November 10, a 1.2-mile-long lahar was also visible in satellite images, extending below the southeast crater. By November 11, the lava flow extended 650 feet below the active vent. Pavlof remained at Aviation Color Code ORANGE for much of 2022, with intermittent lava effusion, small explosions, and low-level ash emissions. On December 17, 2022, AVO lowered the Aviation Color Code and Volcano Alert Level at Pavlof from ORANGE/WATCH to YELLOW/ADVISORY, stating that no explosions had been detected since December 11, 2022, and no elevated surface temperatures or incandescent lava since December 2, 2022. On January 19, 2023, AVO lowered the Aviation Color Code and Volcano Alert Level to GREEN/NORMAL.

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