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AVO VOLCANO ACTIVITY NOTIFICATION
AVO/USGS Volcanic Activity Notice

Volcano: Tanaga (VNUM #311080)

Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Previous Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY

Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE
Previous Aviation Color Code: YELLOW


Issued: Thursday, March 9, 2023, 5:19 PM AKST
Source: Alaska Volcano Observatory
Notice Number: 2023/A268
Location: N 51 deg 53 min W 178 deg 8 min
Elevation: 5925 ft (1806 m)
Area: Aleutians

Volcanic Activity Summary:

Over the past 48 hours, earthquake activity near Tanaga Volcano has been elevated and continues. This sustained activity indicates an increased potential for eruption at the volcano. Therefore AVO is raising the Aviation Color Code to ORANGE and the Volcano Alert Level to WATCH.

Seismic activity is also elevated at Takawangha volcano, which is about 8 km (5 miles) east of Tanaga on Tanaga Island. If an eruption were to occur, it is uncertain at this stage if it would come from Tanaga or Takawangha. 

AVO analysts continue to monitor the situation closely, and locate events as time permits. Earthquakes are occurring under Tanaga Island at a rate of up to several per minute. The largest event over the past 24 hours was a M3.9 located under Tanaga Volcano. 

No eruptive activity or signs of unrest have been detected in satellite or other monitoring data.

Tanaga is monitored with a local seismic network, a single local infrasound sensor, regional infrasound and lightning sensors, and satellite imagery.  

For current monitoring data: https://avo.alaska.edu/activity/Tanaga.php">https://avo.alaska.edu/activity/Tanaga.php



Recent Observations:
[Volcanic cloud height] None observed
[Other volcanic cloud information] None observed

Remarks:

Tanaga Island lies in the Andreanof Islands approximately 100 km (62 miles) west of the community of Adak and 2025 km (1260 miles) SW of Anchorage. The northern half of the island is home to the Tanaga volcanic complex, comprising three main volcanic edifices. Tanaga Volcano is the tallest of these (1,806 m or 5,925 ft) and lies in the center of the complex. The last reported eruption of Tanaga occurred in 1914 and earlier eruptions were reported in 1763-1770, 1791, and 1829. Reports of these eruptions are vague, but deposits on the flanks of the volcano show that typical eruptions produce blocky lava flows and occasional ash clouds. Eruptions have occurred both from the summit vent and a 1,584 m (5,197 ft)-high satellite vent on the volcano's northeast flank. Immediately west of Tanaga volcano lies Sajaka, a 1,354 m (4,443 ft)-high compound edifice with an older cone to the east that collapsed into the sea within the last few thousand years, and a new cone that has grown in the breach. The new cone is 1,312 m (4,305 ft) high and consists of steeply dipping, interbedded cinders and thin, spatter-fed lava flows. To the east of Tanaga lies Takawangha, which is separated from the other active volcanic vents by a ridge of older rock. Takawangha's 1,449 m (4,754 ft)-high summit is mostly ice-covered, except for four young craters that have erupted ash and lava flows in the last few thousand years. Parts of Takawangha's edifice are hydrothermally altered and may be unstable, and could produce localized debris avalanches. No historical eruptions are known from Sajaka or Takawangha; however, field work shows that recent eruptions have occurred and it is possible that historic eruptions attributed only to Tanaga may instead have come from these other vents.



Contacts:

Michelle Coombs, Scientist-in-Charge, USGS mcoombs@usgs.gov (907) 786-7497

David Fee, Coordinating Scientist, UAFGI dfee1@alaska.edu (907) 378-5460

 



The Alaska Volcano Observatory is a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys.


(1) VOLCANO OBSERVATORY NOTICE FOR AVIATION (VONA)
(2) Issued: (20230310/0219Z)
(3) Volcano: Tanaga (VNUM #311080)
(4) Current Color Code: ORANGE
(5) Previous Color Code: YELLOW
(6) Source: Alaska Volcano Observatory
(7) Notice Number: 2023/A268
(8) Volcano Location: N 51 deg 53 min W 178 deg 8 min
(9) Area: Aleutians
(10) Summit Elevation: 5925 ft (1806 m)
(11) Volcanic Activity Summary:

Over the past 48 hours, earthquake activity near Tanaga Volcano has been elevated and continues. This sustained activity indicates an increased potential for eruption at the volcano. Therefore AVO is raising the Aviation Color Code to ORANGE and the Volcano Alert Level to WATCH.

Seismic activity is also elevated at Takawangha volcano, which is about 8 km (5 miles) east of Tanaga on Tanaga Island. If an eruption were to occur, it is uncertain at this stage if it would come from Tanaga or Takawangha. 

AVO analysts continue to monitor the situation closely, and locate events as time permits. Earthquakes are occurring under Tanaga Island at a rate of up to several per minute. The largest event over the past 24 hours was a M3.9 located under Tanaga Volcano. 

No eruptive activity or signs of unrest have been detected in satellite or other monitoring data.

Tanaga is monitored with a local seismic network, a single local infrasound sensor, regional infrasound and lightning sensors, and satellite imagery.  

For current monitoring data: https://avo.alaska.edu/activity/Tanaga.php">https://avo.alaska.edu/activity/Tanaga.php

(12) Volcanic cloud height: None observed
(13) Other volcanic cloud information: None observed
(14) Remarks:

Tanaga Island lies in the Andreanof Islands approximately 100 km (62 miles) west of the community of Adak and 2025 km (1260 miles) SW of Anchorage. The northern half of the island is home to the Tanaga volcanic complex, comprising three main volcanic edifices. Tanaga Volcano is the tallest of these (1,806 m or 5,925 ft) and lies in the center of the complex. The last reported eruption of Tanaga occurred in 1914 and earlier eruptions were reported in 1763-1770, 1791, and 1829. Reports of these eruptions are vague, but deposits on the flanks of the volcano show that typical eruptions produce blocky lava flows and occasional ash clouds. Eruptions have occurred both from the summit vent and a 1,584 m (5,197 ft)-high satellite vent on the volcano's northeast flank. Immediately west of Tanaga volcano lies Sajaka, a 1,354 m (4,443 ft)-high compound edifice with an older cone to the east that collapsed into the sea within the last few thousand years, and a new cone that has grown in the breach. The new cone is 1,312 m (4,305 ft) high and consists of steeply dipping, interbedded cinders and thin, spatter-fed lava flows. To the east of Tanaga lies Takawangha, which is separated from the other active volcanic vents by a ridge of older rock. Takawangha's 1,449 m (4,754 ft)-high summit is mostly ice-covered, except for four young craters that have erupted ash and lava flows in the last few thousand years. Parts of Takawangha's edifice are hydrothermally altered and may be unstable, and could produce localized debris avalanches. No historical eruptions are known from Sajaka or Takawangha; however, field work shows that recent eruptions have occurred and it is possible that historic eruptions attributed only to Tanaga may instead have come from these other vents.

(15) Contacts:

Michelle Coombs, Scientist-in-Charge, USGS mcoombs@usgs.gov (907) 786-7497

David Fee, Coordinating Scientist, UAFGI dfee1@alaska.edu (907) 378-5460

 

(16) Next Notice:

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Page modified: December 2, 2016 10:12
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